Sinclair president visits Huber Heights Learning Center

Sinclair Communit College President Steven Johnson visited the Huber Heights Learning Center on Feb. 19. Sinclair students Jordan Martin (left) and Matt Collins (center) spoke with Johnson during his visit. --photo by Joe Stueve

Sinclair Communit College President Steven Johnson visited the Huber Heights Learning Center on Feb. 19. Sinclair students Jordan Martin (left) and Matt Collins (center) spoke with Johnson during his visit. --photo by Joe Stueve

HUBER HEIGHTS — Sinclair Community College President Dr. Steven Johnson has heard nothing but love for the institutional satellite campuses.

“They love it,” said Johnson about Sinclair satellite students. “They love the staff, the faculty, the convenience.”

Johnson visited the Huber Heights Learning Center on Thursday, Feb. 19, to chat with students and staff. Johnson spent an hour in the HHLC’s lobby talking with students and getting a feel for what being a student on a satellite is like. Johnson said he met with about 10 students asking each their opinion on the HHLC.

“That’s cool that he finds time to visit,” said HHLC student Jonathan Feit.

Feit, a 19-year-old computer science major, is taking all of his classes at the HHLC this quarter. He said commuting to a satellite school is less of a hassle than traveling downtown.

“It’s much easier to get to,” Feit said. “It makes it easier when it’s snowing out.  It’s a better convenience.”

Feit said a normal trip from his Huber Heights home to Sinclair’s downtown campus takes around 20-30 minutes while a five-minute drive brings him to the HHLC.

With a variety of satellite campuses surrounding the Dayton-area, Johnson is aware students appreciate the easy commute options.

“We’re in the neighborhood,” Johnson said. “Time can be spent taking classes instead of commuting as much.”

During 2008’s Fall quarter, the HHLC reached the 1,000-student mark with a total of 1,010 students. The HHLC has nine classrooms, including a nurses-aid training lab, a computer room and a science room.  The Huber Heights YMCA is attached to the HHLC and offers a daycare for children between six weeks to nine years old.

Latonia Peak-Brown is the coordinator for the HHLC.  Peak-Brown mentioned the pros and cons of attending a satellite school.

“If you live in this area, it’s closer to home,” Peak-Brown said. “Parking is free here, also.”

Smaller classrooms and personal attention from instructors are positives for the campus, according to Peak-Brown. A con includes the limited degree options available to students at the HHLC.

“We only offer the Liberal Arts and Sciences degree and the Business Administration degree,” Peak-Brown said.

Kristen Walker, a 19-year-old nursing major, is at the HHLC to “knock out” her general education courses. Walker said she enjoys the size compared to downtown’s campus.

“It’s smaller and easier to figure out where you are,” Walker said. “I got lost in downtown on my first day.”

Walker said there are a few negative aspects to being a student on a satellite campus.

“I can never get a computer when I need it,” Walker said. “There aren’t enough here.”

Food can be a problem on a satellite campus, as well.  At the HHLC, students live with a simple vending machine filled with chips, crackers, pretzels and other assorted items.

“That’s what is nice about (downtown campus) is you can go to the lunchroom and get food,” Feit said.

Peak-Brown felt President Johnson’s presence at the HHLC was great for student and administrative morale.

“They can see from their perspective what we’re doing here,” said Peak-Brown about the administrative visit. “They want to come out and hear what the students have to say.”

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